Stories we’ve enjoyed

Roald Dahl's Matilda, on reading.

Roald Dahl’s Matilda, on reading.

Each week, children from years 1 and 2 and Reception visit the library to select books and enjoy story time. We thought it would be helpful to keep a record of what we have read and share it with families and friends of the school so you can see too.

If you have recommendations for favourite books that you have read, do let us know!

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Having fun making Supertatoes, Supercarrots and pretend evil peas…

Yesterday, in the Key Stage 1 library lunchtime session, we decided to have some fun based on the book Supertato, by Sue Hendra, which we had recently read together.

In the story (full review below), a brave Supertato rescues the other vegetables in his supermarket from the evil doings of a pea, so we thought we could have a go at creating our own versions of Supertato and the evil pea, with a carrot or two thrown in for good measure. The results were fantastic!

The super veg are here!

The super veg are here!

smiley sahar

This is more like a pirate potato!

aleesa

A ghostly pea

This supertato had a lovely decoration around him.

This supertato had a lovely decoration around him.

Yay! A brave carrot!

Yay! A brave carrot!

This carrot's cape is billowing in the breeze!

This carrot’s cape is billowing in the breeze!

We liked the 'baseball stitching' effect on this fine supertato.

We liked the ‘baseball stitching’ effect on this fine supertato.

Wow - this supertato has mutated into a ninja-tato!

Wow – this supertato has mutated into a ninja-tato!

For anyone who has not yet read the book, here’s a review.

Image courtesy of waterstones.com

What it’s about:

All is quiet in the supermarket, until a veggie villain breaks loose and starts terrorizing carrots, broccoli, and cucumbers (amongst others). Will the vegetables be doomed to chaos or can Supertato save the day?

Our review: Key Stage 1 has listened to this book several times now in storytime and, on each occasion, we’ve all been reduced to excitement and laughter at the bright and entertaining images and the fast-paced, fun text. The spreads are laid out intelligently so, where there’s a moment of tension, it is maintained till the page is turned over (something which I have struggled with in other picture books, where the cliffhanger is on the facing page to the resolution!).

The idea of a tiny pea terrorizing massive vegetables is one that tickles most children’s sense of humour, and Supertato is high up there in the league of Super Heroes (except he’s not really able to see small details that children, even sitting a foot or two away on the carpet can spot). This is the hallmark of a good picture book – the tiny details that children always seem to pick up on that adult eyes glide over. I have read this story several times this week and the children always leap up at the end, at the last spread, to share with me what they have noticed; I can’t say too much here in case I spoil the surprise!

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